iFixit Releases Improved Toolkits For Taking Apart All Your Apple Gear

 

If you are like me, then simply playing around with the software installed on your Apple gear just doesn’t seem to be enough any more, I enjoy opening up the device to see in innards, as well as exchange the default parts with better upgrades. One thing however that hinders many Apple fans from opening their Mac or iDevice are the screws that Apple uses, well now there is a new toolkit on the street that will help ease the process. iFixit’s has just released two new and improved toolkits.

The 54 Bit Driver Kit is perfect for the DIY enthusiast, and it won’t break your bank at only $25. Here’s some of the additions to the new kit:

  • Pentalobe bits to open the iPhone 4, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro.
  • T7 through T20 security bits to fit Torx security screws with a pin in the center.
  • A full line of metric nut drivers.
  • JIS bits to fit the screws found in digital cameras, R/C helicopters, and other high-end electronics.
  • A custom adapter to allow our small precision bits to be used in standard 1/4” screwdrivers with larger handles, ratcheting handles, or torque drivers.
  • A 60 mm extension that doubles as a T-handle, making it easy to get extra torque and remove stubborn screws.

The Pro Tech Base Toolkit is the larger option with every tool you need for your geeky arsenal. It comes with the 54 Bit Driver Kit included, which is a great deal for $60. Here are the new additions:

  • 54 Bit Driver Kit
  • Anti-static wrist strap
  • 4 plastic opening tools
  • 4 precision tweezers
  • Spudger
  • 4 metal spudgers
  • Small suction cup
  • iFixit ruler
  • Custom-made tool roll

Whats great about the Toolkit is the fact that you can use it for so many different devices, not only Apple Products, I used the screwdrivers previously to open up my PS3, and DVD player.

You can order both kits on iFixit’s website just in time for Christmas!

Apple built Siri-specific proximity sensor into iPhone 4S

During iFixit’s teardown of the iPhone 4S, the site came across a component that it couldn’t immediately identify. After subsequent testing, iFixit has determined that the iPhone 4S has an infrared LED that acts as a secondary proximity sensor, and its functions appear to be tied directly to Siri.

All earlier models of iPhones have had a proximity sensor designed to shut the handset’s touchscreen off when you raise it to your ear. This is designed to prevent your face from dialing numbers while you’re on a phone call. The sensor is normally only active during phone calls or when using a VoIP app like Skype.

In contrast, this new infrared LED is constantly active if you have enabled “Raise to Speak” in Siri’s settings. The whole purpose of the sensor is essentially the same as the iPhone’s traditional proximity sensor, just with a different function; instead of deactivating something, this sensor instead activates Siri when you raise it to your ear.

Although the LED is constantly active if you have “Raise to Speak” enabled, it’s most likely drawing a minuscule amount of power and thus not the cause of widely-reported battery issues in the iPhone 4S (which aforthcoming iOS 5 update hopes to address). It’s also worth noting, as iFixit rather humorously does, that although the iPhone 4S will constantly be emitting an infrared beam in your direction as you use it, the beam is completely harmless.

iFixit iPad 2 Teardown Reveals Big Battery, Tiny Logicboard

copied from cultofmac.com

Remember when logicboards were one of the biggest components of a computer? Not any more.

An iFixit teardown of the iPad 2 reveals a logicboard the size of a couple of matchbooks. By contrast, the three batteries consume almost all the interior space.

The teardown  can be found on the iFixit site.

The iPad 2 isn’t easy to open, iFixit says: it’s sealed with a ton of glue.

Here’s a couple more shots of the internals:

iFixit: And just like that, it’s open. No clips, just tons of glue. As much as we hated trying to remove the clips in the original iPad, this much adhesive is even more of a pain. Be ready to crack your front panel if you dare open it! We’ll be investigating the best way to get inside over the next few weeks.

iFixit: “Lifting off the LCD exposes iPad 2′s battery. This is a 3.8V, 25 watt-hour unit. That’s just a hair more than the original iPad’s 24.8 watt-hours, so any improved battery performance can be attributed to software and other hardware improvements.”

iFixit gets an iPad app!

If you have ever needed any help with your iDevice then you will know that the best site to visit is iFixit.com Now they have have just released a new iPad app that aims to be a free, easily-referenced glossary for their healthy library of open source self-repair manuals for every gadget under the sun: from the first generation iPod to the new, nigh-un-self-serviceable MacBook Air.

Even if you don’t need help right now then I would still download the App!